September 27, 2021

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Geosyntec Practitioners Coauthor a Paper on the Use of Electrokinetics and Lactate During Bioremediation in the Journal Water Research

Ainsley Inglis, Nicholas Head, Dave Hogberg, Marlaina Auger (Ontario), and David Reynolds, Ph.D. (Sydney) coauthored a paper entitled "Electrokinetically-enhanced emplacement of lactate in a chlorinated solvent contaminated clay site to promote bioremediation," published in Volume 201 of Water Research on August 1, 2021.

Ainsley Inglis was the lead author, and Geosyntec staff coauthors were Nicholas Head, David Reynolds, Dave Hogberg, and Marlaina Auger. Other coauthors were Ahmed I. A. Chowdhury, Ariel Nunez Garcia, Elizabeth Edwards, Line Lomheim, Kela Weber, Sarah J. Wallace, Leanne M. Austrins, Jennifer Hayman, Audrey Sidebottom, Jake Eimers, Jason I. Gerhard, and Denis M. O'Carroll.

Water Research publishes refereed, original research papers on all aspects of the science and technology of the anthropogenic water cycle, water quality, and its management worldwide. Its audience includes biologists, chemical engineers, chemists, civil engineers, environmental engineers, limnologists, and microbiologists.

The International Water Association is a nonprofit organization and knowledge hub for the water sector with more than 60 years of experience connecting water professionals worldwide to find solutions to the world's water challenges.

Abstract

Bioremediation through the injection of electron donors and bacterial cultures is effective at treating chlorinated solvent contamination. However, it has had limited application in low permeability zones where amendments cannot be delivered successfully. This field-scale study investigated the application of electrokinetics to enhance the delivery of lactate at a clay site contaminated with chlorinated solvents. Groundwater and soil samples were collected before, during and for 1 year after the 71-day field test and analyzed for a wide suite of chemical and biological parameters. Lactate was successfully delivered to all monitoring locations. Lactate emplacement resulted in the stimulation of bacterial populations, specifically within the phylum Firmicutes, which contains fermenters and strict anaerobes. This likely led to biodegradation, as the field trial resulted in significant decreases in both soil and aqueous phase chlorinated solvent concentrations. Contaminant decreases were also partially attributable to dilution, given evidence of some advective lactate flux. This research provides evidence that electrokinetically-enhanced bioremediation has potential as a treatment strategy for contaminated low permeability strata.

More Information

Learn more about the article: Electrokinetically-enhanced emplacement of lactate in a chlorinated solvent contaminated clay site to promote bioremediation
Learn more about Water Research: www.sciencedirect.com/journal/water-research
For consultation regarding remediation of chlorinated solvents, contact Nicholas at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., Ainsley at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., David Reynolds at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., Dave Hogberg at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or Marlaina at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..